Archive Page 2

18. Fix It!

Here’s the Fix It! learning interaction from my eBook, Engaging Interactions For eLearning:

Description: A problem or crisis evolves and the learner is the only person who can save the day. Have them resolve the problem using the information they just learned in the course. Raise tension and escalate circumstances throughout the interaction. Present feedback based on their actions, whether or not they save the day.
Example: Consider this scenario:

An emergency erupts at a factory: a machine overheats and causes a major malfunction. What steps do you take to prevent injuries and reduce further equipment damage?

Level(s) of Interaction: 2, 3, 4
Knowledge Type(s): Factual
Conceptual
Procedural
Metacognitive
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17. Read / Watch and Reflect

Here’s the Read / Watch and Reflect learning interaction from my eBook, Engaging Interactions For eLearning:

Description: Have the learner read a passage (or watch a video or view a series of images) and then respond to questions using an open text area or other form fields. Have them discuss their opinions of what happened, or reflect on the different outcomes that were possible for the given scenario.
Example: Consider this scenario:

Watch a video of a public speaker or politician. Identify techniques used by the speaker to persuade the listener. Were they effective? Why or why not?

Level(s) of Interaction: 2, 3, 4
Knowledge Type(s): Factual
Conceptual
Procedural
Metacognitive

16. Scavenger Hunt

Here’s the Scavenger Hunt learning interaction from my eBook, Engaging Interactions For eLearning:

Description: This is a great interaction for teaching learners how to use new web sites and other information systems. Present the learner with a list of items that they must find – using a web site or information system – to complete this exercise. Have the learner obtain different pieces of information and then come back to plug the values into fields on the page. To do this, they will have to explore this new resource and become familiar with its navigation, search features, etc.
Example: Have the learner try to find nuggets of information on an intranet site. An example question would be, "What department is in charge of determining the pricing of our products?" The learner would research the question and then come back and enter, "Sales and Marketing," or something similar.
Level(s) of Interaction: 2, 3
Knowledge Type(s): Factual

15. Using an Agent or Character

Here’s the Using an Agent or Character learning interaction from my eBook, Engaging Interactions For eLearning:

Description: Use a character (a.k.a. agent) that assists the learner as they progress through an eLearning course. Have the character introduce and discuss content, provide tips and tricks, and periodically stop to ask assessment questions.

Important: Make sure the learner has the ability to show/hide the character (in case it becomes annoying).

Allow the learner to interact with the character by asking it questions (which actually searches a knowledgebase or existing set of questions). Also, if the learner appears to be having issues with an exercise, the character can provide clues.

Example: In a course teaching how to use a new GPS system, use a talking map or compass as a character to introduce content, describe features of the device, and assist with exercises.
Level(s) of Interaction: 2, 3
Knowledge Type(s): Factual
Conceptual
Procedural
Metacognitive

14. Teach-back (a.k.a. Train the New Person)

Here’s the Teach-back (a.k.a. Train the New Person) learning interaction from my eBook, Engaging Interactions For eLearning:

Description: Put the learner in a scenario where they must prepare training for a new member of their team. Have them assemble and organize content by relevance and based on what they have already learned in the course.

For example, provide 20 phrases or pieces of information where only 8 of the pieces are correct. Instruct the learner to select which information they would use to train the new person on their team.

Example: Consider this scenario:

Your boss has given you the opportunity to grow your sales team to improve the bottom line. How would you train the newest sales associate to help your team achieve this goal? Select the content that is most important.

Level(s) of Interaction: 2, 3
Knowledge Type(s): Factual
Conceptual
Procedural
Metacognitive

13. Before and After or Old Way vs. New Way

Here’s the Before and After or Old Way vs. New Way learning interaction from my eBook, Engaging Interactions For eLearning:

Description: If introducing a new technology, system, or process, show reasons why the new way was chosen. Have the learner sort out information by the old way vs. the new way to make sure they grasp and understand the difference between the two. Justify why things are being changed and how the new way should be better.

Note: Remember that new employees probably did not see the old way, so do not reference it in a way that would require them to learn the old way in order to successfully complete the interaction.

Example: A new cash register is being introduced at a retail establishment. Have the learner explain its advantages and why it is being used. Have the learner work through a series of exercises identifying the Old Way and New Way so that they understand why the change is being made, and how to work with the new system.
Level(s) of Interaction: 2, 3
Knowledge Type(s): Factual
Conceptual
Procedural

12. What’s Wrong With This Picture?

Here’s the What’s Wrong With This Picture? learning interaction from my eBook, Engaging Interactions For eLearning:

Description: Show a photo of a workspace relevant to the learner (ex. inside an auto shop, a dentist’s office, an assembly line, etc.). Explain that several items in the photo pose a safety risk or are just plain wrong for the setting. Have the learner identify safety hazards or potential problems in the workspace by clicking the area(s) of concern. Display a visual cue to indicate if they are correct or incorrect. You may also have the learner identify why an item is a risk. This interaction may allow for role-play, as well: "You are a safety inspector who must identify problem areas on a construction site."
Example: Consider this scenario:

As the manager of a restaurant, you must make sure the kitchen is as clean and organized as possible at all times. There are 10 potential problems in the photo of the kitchen below. Click on each potential problem and explain how it could negatively affect your employees, your customers, and your reputation.

Level(s) of Interaction: 2, 3
Knowledge Type(s): Factual
Conceptual
Procedural